Background

Despite the fact that up to a third of the global population has metabolic syndrome (MetS), it has been overlooked in clinical settings. This study assesses the impact of a physician-supervised nonsurgical medical weight management program on the prevalence of MetS and its key indicators.

Methods

479 overweight or obese participants aged 19 years or older were included in a prospective long-term longitudinal study. Changes in MetS and its key indicators were assessed using the binomial exact test and Wilcoxon signed rank test respectively, in an intent to treat (ITT) study population.

Results

52% of participants (n=249) had MetS at baseline. Prevalence of MetS among participants decreased steadily with significant changes from baseline observed at weeks 13 (31.8%, p<0.0001), 26 (28.7%, p<0.0001), and 39 (21.6%, p<0.0008) and marginally significant changes from baseline observed at week 52 (16.7%, p<0.059) of the study. Improvements in key indicators of MetS were observed throughout the study among participants.

Conclusions

Among overweight and obese participants that self-enrolled in a physician-supervised non-surgical weight management program, a consistent reduction in the prevalence of MetS and improvement in its components was observed from baseline to week 52 in the program. These findings confirm that weight loss is inversely associated with prevalence of MetS and its key indicators among overweight and obese individuals.